For my students – legitimacy of the EU – Mainstream topics of EU law seminar

Article for 5 September, 2015
Follesdal-Hix-JCMS-2006

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Online course – the EU and human rights

The website of the course can be reached here:

About this course

Whether you are an EU citizen or not, this course concerns you! The EU is a major global actor in the field of human rights. EU treaties state that human rights are a fundamental value of the Union, which must be a ‘silver thread’ in all its policies. The EU now acts within an impressive array of competences, and therefore has the potential to impact – positively or negatively – anyone’s human rights.

This EU and Human Rights course teaches the basics of human rights, placing the EU at the centre of investigation. The course will examine a number of key questions:

  • What factors are key to making the EU a positive or a negative force for human rights? An example is the economic crisis: what impact has it had on people’s human rights in the EU and the world?
  • Which actors, friends or foes, must the EU engage with to successfully promote human rights? Examples include NGOs, businesses, or other international organisations like the Council of Europe or the United Nations.
  • In key policy sectors in which the EU is active, what is on balance the impact of the EU? Examples include trade, development, migration social policy or international crisis management.

All of the course activities aim to improve your understanding of how the EU, alone or in combination with other local or global, state or non-state actors, can better promote and uphold human rights worldwide.

The course is intended for anyone interested in human rights and the EU, human rights law, European law, European Studies, international relations, global governance, etc.

It is divided into four modules:

1: The EU and Human Rights: Value Promotion and Coherence

2: Promoting Human Rights inside the EU

3: Promoting Human Rights in EU External Action

4: Capitalising on Success and Remedying Flaws

This MOOC is based on the FRAME project (www.fp7-frame.eu), which has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration. (Grant Agreement No. 320000)

See more about The EU and Human Rights

What you’ll learn

  • How the EU works
  • What the EU does
  • How the EU affects human rights
  • Where the EU can do better to be a positive force for human rights

View Course Syllabus

Meet the instructors

  • bio for Joana Abrisketa Uriarte

    Joana Abrisketa Uriarte

  • bio for Wolfgang Benedek

    Wolfgang Benedek

  • bio for Florence Benoît-Rohmer

    Florence Benoît-Rohmer

  • bio for Zdzislaw Kedzia

    Zdzislaw Kedzia

  • bio for Jeffrey Kenner

    Jeffrey Kenner

  • bio for Eva Maria Lassen

    Eva Maria Lassen

  • bio for Tamara Lewis

    Tamara Lewis

  • bio for Carmen Márquez Carrasco

    Carmen Márquez Carrasco

  • bio for Monika Mayrhofer

    Monika Mayrhofer

  • bio for Elina Pirjatanniemi

    Elina Pirjatanniemi

  • bio for Karolina Podstawa

    Karolina Podstawa

  • bio for Lorena Sosa

    Lorena Sosa

  • bio for Jan Wouters

    Jan Wouters

  • bio for Tamás Ziegler

    Tamás Ziegler

Free access to the best education, open to anyone

  • Real Classes

    The best classes from the best professors and universities

  • New skills

    Learn through cool tools, videos, quizzes and game-like labs

  • On your schedule

    Take courses when you want and at your own pace

Found a highly interesting paper on a new institution

available on ssrn here

Upholding the Rule of Law in the EU: On the Commission’s ‘Pre-Article 7 Procedure’ as a Timid Step in the Right Direction


Dimitry Kochenov


Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University; University of Groningen – Faculty of Law

Laurent Pech


Middlesex University – School of Law

April 2015

Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies Research Paper No. RSCAS 2015/24
Abstract:

This paper provides a detailed analysis of two institutional reforms, respectively put forward by the European Commission in March 2014 and by the Council of the EU in December 2014 – on how to tackle the problem of Member States’ non-compliance with the principle of the rule of law, which is one of the fundamental values of the Union according to Article 2 TEU. It is submitted that while both proposals definitely represent a timid step in the right direction, the Commission’s ‘light-touch’ proposal falls short of what is required to effectively address ongoing and serious threats to the rule of law within the EU but is however clearly preferable to the Council’s alternative proposal to hold an annual rule of law dialogue among all Member States within the Council itself.

Refugees in Hungary – recent events in light of the migration policy of the EU

!!! Unfortunately, I had to skip the conference below – however, for those who have time, it still could be of interest.

The Project for Democratic Union’s Budapest Office is partnering with AEGEE-Budapest in organizing a Conference on the European refugee crisis. The primary focus of the event will be Hungarian migration and refugee policy in light of general European practice.

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For many years the migration of European citizens within the EU has been causing worries due to its effect on the European labour market. Due to the high number of foreign job-seekers, governments of some Member States have raised their voices and called for urgent action and the reform of the EU’s migration policy. At the same time, the question of refugees coming from third countries – mainly war-zones – has been brought to the fore, after several accidents have occurred in the Mediterranean Sea.

Initially, only Mediterranean states were concerned by this situation, but lately other border countries of the EU, such as Bulgaria and Hungary, have become affected by the massive flow of often illegal immigrants and refugees. Although the EU is trying to find a coordinated answer to the problem, some countries managed to receive opt-outs and were able to carry out unilateral responses to this unprecedented situation. However, these practices are not far from being dangerous because in countries where extremism and xenophobia are on the rise, such as Hungary or Poland, they can result in a hostile attitude and hatred towards the people in despair.

Hungary’s fence erected on its Serbian border is only one example of the questionable methods EU Member States are using to solve the refugee crisis. The conference will address the Hungarian migration and refugee policy in light of the general European practice. It will also cover the EU’s current attempts to reform its migration policy and to show paths towards an acceptable solution to the situation.

Speakers:

Péter Balázs – Professor at Central European University, former Member of the European Commission, former Foreign Minister of Hungary

Carlos Puente – Economist, Attorney at Law, Political Scientist, Senior Visting Professor

Dezső Tamás Ziegler – Senior Lecturer at Eötvös Loránd University – Faculty of Social Sciences, Research Fellow at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences – Institute for Legal Studies

Event audience: Open to Public

For any further questions you may contact: Veronika Czina from PDU Budapest veronika.czina@democraticunion.eu or Péter Sczigel from AEGEE-Budapest peter.sczigel@aegee-budapest.hu

Corvinus University
Fővám tér 8 – Budapest

Date/Time
Date(s) – 23/09/2015
7:10 pm – 8:40 pm

Location
Corvinus University
Fővám tér 8
Budapest, Hungary